If you’re a writer and you see this post, stop what you’re doing.

mark-helsing:

WHENEVER YOU SEE THIS POST ON YOUR DASH, STOP WHAT YOU’RE DOING AND WRITE ONE SENTENCE FOR YOUR CURRENT PROJECT.

Just one sentence. Stop blogging for one minute and write a single sentence. It could be dialogue, it could be a nice description of scenery, it could be a metaphor, I don’t care. The point is, do it. Then, when you finish, you can get back to blogging.

If this gets viral, you might just have your novel finished by next Tuesday.

spicy-vagina-tacos:

panerasexual:

men are so afraid of confident girls and its so funny

one time my ex was tryna get me back and he was all “you know I think you’re stupid attractive” and I was like “no shit because I am” and he got so personally offended and it’s the greatest memory I have

I know making a to-do list isn’t the same as actually doing the things on the to-do list
but I am determined to do the thing.

I know making a to-do list isn’t the same as actually doing the things on the to-do list

but I am determined to do the thing.

That’s the thing about this thing: by writing what you love, I don’t mean, making sure every day of writing is a bliss-fueled romp around the bounce house of your imagination. No matter how much you love the material, some days are going to feel like chewing on a brick. And some days you’ll hate what you’re writing no matter what — the point is to begin with work that speaks to you, calls to you, grabs you by your genital configuration and demands to be written.
From Chuck Wendig’s “Why You Should Write What You Love”
reblog if you dont have a bra on

This is what I’ve been working on the past few days. A smeet! What’s his name? Smeety Sam? Smeety Petey? jk I already picked out a name for him

Guess who he’s getting stuck with.

I can imagine Dib having this problem a lot.

naamahdarling:

howtonotsuckatgamedesign:

mirrepp:

Some harsh but very very true words

When people let me review their portfolios (on career day or open days at my game design school) I explicitly ban them from commenting during the review… …because otherwise they will follow the impulse to downplay everything I see in an attempt at being humble."this is an old image…"
"I’m not happy with that one…""this is just a sketch…"
"I did this really quickly…""there is better stuff on later pages…"It’s totally understandable to have those impulses. The quality of art is not empirical data and therefore impossible to measure. Good art, bad art, it all comes down to standards. And you don’t want to come off as naive or self-absorbed.But just don’t do it. Don’t talk yourself down in front of others. In the best case you have someone supportive who now thinks “damn, this person needs to be prepped up all the time. Do I really want to work with somebody like that” or in worst case “now that you say it, yeah, this is kinda lame/rushed/unfinished/lazy, go away.”You can only submit what you have. If that is not enough, then it’s not enough. Your attitude will not change that. But if it is enough, you can do serious harm by not being confident of who you are now.This means appreciating what you are able to do right now and have a clear vision of what you want to learn, be confident that you will learn it in time. Be proud.

This is really important.  Eliminate this urge.  Eliminate it professionally, when having contact with people in a position to buy your work.  Eliminate it socially, when you just share your work for fun.  Destroy this urge as thoroughly as you possibly can.
Because when you have done that, you’ll find that you feel at least 25% less shitty about your own work.  You lose the urge to do it.  You stop reinforcing those negative thoughts, and they retreat.  They may never go away completely (although they might!) but this is good practice for ignoring those thoughts flat-out.
Don’t shit-talk yourself.  Even if you can’t be SO PROUD, don’t ever try to influence anyone’s opinion toward your work in the negative.
Try to love your work.  Try to see what you learned from each piece, even if it’s a failure.  If you feel that you learned nothing, appreciate the fact that just spending time on it is honing your skills and giving you valuable practice.
i used to be super not-confident in my own work.  When I stopped pointing out the flaws in my own stuff, I felt better about it almost immediately.

I had a friend who did this a few years ago; she’d look at her old art/writing and agonize over how she was inexperienced back then or w/e. Well of course she was, it’s a normal thing that happens to everyone, but she shouldn’t beat herself up about it. That’s like hating yourself for starting school in kindergarten instead of going to college immediately. Most novice writers/artists go through the same bad habits and mistakes, and it’s how we learn.
I went through that self-defeating phase too, and then I got over it. I grew up. My philosophy is, if I don’t like my own stuff, who will? Sure, I might be able to ride along for a while on pity, but that’s not the same as people liking my work on its own merit. And people get sick of creatives who are always down on their own work. It’s a road that goes nowhere.
There are artists and writers I admire here on Tumblr. When I read their stories, whatever errors or nitpicky things I find doesn’t erase the honesty that’s in the prose. They’re skilled enough that the honesty comes through in their storytelling, in character actions and motivations.
When a writer shares that kind of honest storytelling, and backpedals furiously into self-loathing at how much people enjoyed it, that kills my soul a little. So they’ve recognized they’ve done way better since then! That’s okay! Improving doesn’t make your past, less-refined efforts a waste of time. Whether people liked it or not, whether the creator liked it or not, taking the time to make the work is never a waste.
It is not a waste of time.
It is NOT a waste of time.

naamahdarling:

howtonotsuckatgamedesign:

mirrepp:

Some harsh but very very true words

When people let me review their portfolios (on career day or open days at my game design school) I explicitly ban them from commenting during the review… …because otherwise they will follow the impulse to downplay everything I see in an attempt at being humble.

"this is an old image…"

"I’m not happy with that one…"

"this is just a sketch…"

"I did this really quickly…"

"there is better stuff on later pages…"

It’s totally understandable to have those impulses. The quality of art is not empirical data and therefore impossible to measure. Good art, bad art, it all comes down to standards. And you don’t want to come off as naive or self-absorbed.

But just don’t do it. Don’t talk yourself down in front of others. In the best case you have someone supportive who now thinks “damn, this person needs to be prepped up all the time. Do I really want to work with somebody like that” or in worst case “now that you say it, yeah, this is kinda lame/rushed/unfinished/lazy, go away.”

You can only submit what you have. If that is not enough, then it’s not enough. Your attitude will not change that. But if it is enough, you can do serious harm by not being confident of who you are now.

This means appreciating what you are able to do right now and have a clear vision of what you want to learn, be confident that you will learn it in time. 

Be proud.




This is really important.  Eliminate this urge.  Eliminate it professionally, when having contact with people in a position to buy your work.  Eliminate it socially, when you just share your work for fun.  Destroy this urge as thoroughly as you possibly can.

Because when you have done that, you’ll find that you feel at least 25% less shitty about your own work.  You lose the urge to do it.  You stop reinforcing those negative thoughts, and they retreat.  They may never go away completely (although they might!) but this is good practice for ignoring those thoughts flat-out.

Don’t shit-talk yourself.  Even if you can’t be SO PROUD, don’t ever try to influence anyone’s opinion toward your work in the negative.

Try to love your work.  Try to see what you learned from each piece, even if it’s a failure.  If you feel that you learned nothing, appreciate the fact that just spending time on it is honing your skills and giving you valuable practice.

i used to be super not-confident in my own work.  When I stopped pointing out the flaws in my own stuff, I felt better about it almost immediately.

I had a friend who did this a few years ago; she’d look at her old art/writing and agonize over how she was inexperienced back then or w/e. Well of course she was, it’s a normal thing that happens to everyone, but she shouldn’t beat herself up about it. That’s like hating yourself for starting school in kindergarten instead of going to college immediately. Most novice writers/artists go through the same bad habits and mistakes, and it’s how we learn.

I went through that self-defeating phase too, and then I got over it. I grew up. My philosophy is, if I don’t like my own stuff, who will? Sure, I might be able to ride along for a while on pity, but that’s not the same as people liking my work on its own merit. And people get sick of creatives who are always down on their own work. It’s a road that goes nowhere.

There are artists and writers I admire here on Tumblr. When I read their stories, whatever errors or nitpicky things I find doesn’t erase the honesty that’s in the prose. They’re skilled enough that the honesty comes through in their storytelling, in character actions and motivations.

When a writer shares that kind of honest storytelling, and backpedals furiously into self-loathing at how much people enjoyed it, that kills my soul a little. So they’ve recognized they’ve done way better since then! That’s okay! Improving doesn’t make your past, less-refined efforts a waste of time. Whether people liked it or not, whether the creator liked it or not, taking the time to make the work is never a waste.

It is not a waste of time.

It is NOT a waste of time.

Translation job claimed there would be much less porn in this term’s work. So I’m like, hell yeah, let’s do this, I’m fucking sick of soul-sucking H-manga!

Then I get my assignment and it’s like

IT’S NOT DIFFERENT AT ALL, IS IT, STEVE

Livejournal icons I made in like 2006. Mostly OCs.

And a clearly mutant Kirby with teeth. He could eat a horse. Whole.

What do you think of Sgt. Frog abridged?

Used to like it, but haven’t for a long time. It’s, like, half a degree of separation from the Funimation dub, if that.

I forgot Iggins was literally shit_that_didnt_happen.txt
monokomo:

i got one less problem without ya

zim u nerd, you can’t flip people off with three fingers

monokomo:

i got one less problem without ya

zim u nerd, you can’t flip people off with three fingers

Fetishizing ‘power’ in women characters – having them kicking ass and always being ready with a putdown - isn’t the same as writing them as human beings.
Jack Graham, in Stephen Moffat - A Case For The Prosecution, a guest post on Philip Sandifer’s blog (via linnealurks)